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Trends and Outliers

TIBCO Spotfire's Business Intelligence Blog

Category Archives: HR Analytics

04/02
2013

Data Analysis Lifts HR’s Bottom-Line Benefit

Human resources has the potential to provide a clearly defined link between a company’s talent and its performance, but only if HR pros can harness the power of data analysis to uncover the insight to have an impact on the business, according to a new report.

hr Data Analysis Lifts HR’s Bottom Line BenefitAn Economist Intelligence Unit survey of 418 global executives reveals that 85% of respondents note that their HR teams don’t excel at providing insightful and predictive data. (Tweet This)

“I believe that well thought-out predictive HR analytics could become as important to the CEO as the balance sheet and P&L statement,” says Robert Bolton, a KPMG Advisory partner.

“In other words, by creating a clear ‘line of sight’ between HR activity and your organization’s bottom-line profitability, HR analytics can provide a tangible link between your people strategy and your organization’s performance,” he notes.

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01/10
2013

Study: Top Firms More Likely to Rely on HR Data Analysis

With a looming talent battle – to attract the workers with the best skills while retaining current employees – the need for human resources departments to make key strategic decisions that are rooted in data analysis is more urgent than ever.

hrtechnologydata 370x229 Study: Top Firms More Likely to Rely on HR Data AnalysisMoreover, a new report finds that high-performing companies are more likely to obtain, analyze and act on workforce metrics compared to low-performing companies.

There are stark differences in the reasons high- and low-performing companies collect HR data as well as who receives HR data analysis, according to a recent study by the Institute for Corporate Productivity (i4cp).

The report is based on a survey of HR professionals at 102 firms. i4cp identifies high- and low-performing companies by asking respondents how their organizations have performed within their markets during the past five years compared to other organizations.

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12/31
2012

The Year of Data + Top 5 Spotfire Blog Posts of 2012

Happy New Year! Just in time for 2013, we’re bringing you the best of our blog from the past year and a New Year’s infographic that we think wraps up the “year of data” quite nicely. It even includes a few memes (bet you can’t get “Gangnam Style” out of your head) and fun facts – on big data, of course – to share on your last work day of the year.

Also, don’t miss our our roundup of the most read posts on the Spotfire blog in 2012.

content 2012 infographic The Year of Data + Top 5 Spotfire Blog Posts of 2012

No. 5 – The 4 Biggest Problems with Big Data: Does big data cause big problems? It can when business leaders don’t recognize which data sets to draw upon and/or know which pressing business issues can be resolved using big data. This post takes a look at the challenges that are associated with big data and makes some key recommendations on how to overcome the four biggest problems with big data.

No. 4 – The Big Data Debate – Scientist vs. Analyst: Who doesn’t love a good debate? This post, which received a lot of comments, shows that you, our readers, love a lively discussion that’s centered around the role of analyst and what the Harvard Business Review calls the “sexiest job of the 21st century.” Read it over again and give us your take on whether the data scientist will continue to be a haute topic or just another trend. And also find out why empowering users can make everyone on your team a data scientist in her own right.

No. 3 – 10 Trends Shaping Big Data in Financial Services: One thing we’ve learned about Spotfire blog readers – you guys and gals love lists of trends. (It must have something to do with the name of our blog!) Go back to this post to find out why nine out of 10 business leaders consider data the fourth factor of production behind labor, land and capital.

No. 2 – Top BI Resolutions and Trends for 2012 from Industry Experts: Our roundup of resolutions and the outlook for 2012 hit home in a big way with our blog readers. Review this post and see if the BI resolutions and predictions match up with the outcome of 2012 for your organization.

No. 1 – 5 Important HR Analytics: Our top post of the year features a big concern in HR – using analytics effectively. This post explores how HR can move beyond reporting what is (the present) or what was (the past) to predicting and analyzing what will be (the future).

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12/19
2012

Data Analysis Not Top of Mind for HR

Many companies are hip-dip in a talent crunch, struggling to acquire and retain the talent that they need to survive in a challenging economic climate.

2008 metrics cover Data Analysis Not Top of Mind for HR  In fact, talent management is the top priority for today’s CEO, according to a recent PricewaterhouseCoopers study. This is being fueled by a talent shortage that’s plaguing 49% of US employers who say they’re challenged to fill mission-critical positions in their organizations

And human resources departments and managers are being blamed – whether justified or not – for these challenges. They’re seen as lagging behind other parts of a company when it comes to using data analysis to get accurate data and metrics to make important business decisions.

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07/24
2012

7 Questions to Answer to Better Manage Your People

Manage people 150x150 7 Questions to Answer to Better Manage Your PeopleGiven the relentless pressure most businesses are under to grow, aligning the workforce with the goals of the organization is more important than ever.

Yet, more often than not, human resources has not evolved to become a strategic partner to the business. Often, company leaders question why their organizations even have HR departments, argues J. Craig Mundy, vice president of HR and communications for the Climate Solutions sector of Ingersoll Rand.

In this Harvard Business Review post, he urges companies to stop simply managing talent and instead use talent solutions to manage talent as a portfolio of investments, some of which will pay much higher returns than others.

As the World Economic Forum points out, in today’s global business environment talent is now the most scarce commodity on the planet. However, only 6% of worldwide HR teams feel they’re experts on the use of analytics in talent management today, notes Josh Bersin, CEO and president of research and consulting firm, Bersin & Associates. Only 20% believe that the data they capture now is highly credible and reliable for decision making in their own organizations, he adds.

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05/01
2012

5 Sure-Fire Ways to Use Analytics to Become a Social Business

social media 300x202 5 Sure Fire Ways to Use Analytics to Become a Social BusinessMany executives see social media as another way to connect with customers and prospects.

Indeed, most organizations have created social media accounts with Facebook, Twitter, and other social sites to help attract “fans” and “followers.” Some organizations even go so far as to engage customers and prospects with games, contests, challenges, and offers.

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04/24
2012

3 Ways HR Analytics Can Boost the Bottom Line

head hunting 300x225 3 Ways HR Analytics Can Boost the Bottom LineHuman resources touches every department across a company, and people are often a company’s most valuable – and expensive – asset.

Why, then, do so many companies make critical HR decisions – like realigning workers to fill shortages in-house versus hiring new workers with the necessary skill sets – without grounding those decisions in HR analytics?

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04/04
2012

5 Important HR Analytics

people 150x150 5 Important HR Analytics Although organizations collect more HR and business data than ever, they still aren’t using that data effectively to predict workforce trends, reduce risks and increase returns, according to a Cornell University study.

To be useful, HR analytics must extend beyond reporting what is (the present) or what was (the past) to predicting and and analyzing what will be (the future), according to most of the executives who participated in the study.

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